“Puketacular” Pumpkin Carving

Happy Halloween! I have one more bonus blog post for you about pumpkin carving (I know, it’s the third one this week!) and then I promise to stop with the posts for bit… well maybe only for a week and a half…

When shopping for pumpkins, I look for the largest ones I can find. The bigger the pumpkin, the more space I have to draw. I also look for pumpkins that are nicely rounded with very little bumps or blemishes. Unfortunately, I had a hard time finding quality pumpkins this year; most of them were bruised or broken. I’m not sure why the pumpkins were in this condition, but I suspect it has something to do with the high water levels we have been experiencing in my province and the ground has been very soggy. The two pumpkins I chose this year weren’t in great condition but I figured they would do alright for carving.

Pumpkin for Project
Photo Copyright © 2019, The Ticking Heart, All Rights Reserved

I wanted the first pumpkin to look disgusting so it didn’t matter that it had some bumps and bruises on the surface. My goal was to recreate the original “puking” pumpkin I had carved ten years ago so I could write a proper tutorial to share with you.

Puk-tacular Pumpkin Results
Photo Copyright © 2019, The Ticking Heart, All Rights Reserved 

Before I began cutting the pumpkin, I drew the face onto a sheet of paper so I knew how I wanted it to look and then re-drew it onto the pumpkin with black marker.

Draw Pumpkin Face
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Then I used a long, thin knife with a serrated blade to carve the pumpkin. First, I cut around the stem until I could remove the top.

Cutting The Pumpkin
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Next, I scraped out the pumpkin “guts” with a metal spoon, separating the pumpkin seeds in one bowl and the pulp in another bowl for later use.

Removing The Insides of the Pumpkin
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Once the pumpkin was scraped out, I cut out the eyes, nose and mouth.

Cutting out the Eyes Nose and the Mouth
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Here’s where the pumpkin starts to get gross. I took some of the pulp from the bowl I had set aside earlier and arranged it so that the pulp was coming out of the pumpkin’s mouth like vomit. The pulp contained a lot more moisture than usual so it didn’t form into strands like I had expected it would but it remained more “chunky” instead.

Gross Puking Pumpkin
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When I compare today’s puking pumpkin to the one I carved ten years ago, I’d have to say that today’s pumpkin looks much more “puketacular” than the original but the original is cuter and more photogenic.

Gross Puking Pumpkin
Photo Copyright © 2019, The Ticking Heart, All Rights Reserved

For the second pumpkin, I wanted it to look cute, so I decided to carve a cat face into the pumpkin. I found the perfect cat face pin on Pinterest (see link here) and asked my husband to draw it out for me. We modified the original pin by adding a mouth for the cat.

Kitty Pumpkin
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Before I conclude this blog post, remember the pumpkin seeds we set aside for later use? We are going to roast them and munch on them while handing out candy tonight. I found an excellent pin on Pinterest by Kristine’s Kitchen (see pin here) that explains how to make crunchy roasted pumpkin seeds and she even provides six different flavouring ideas!

Pumpkin Seeds
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I’d love to hear about your best pumpkin carving designs! Reply in the comments below and share pictures of your completed pumpkins.

Have a happy Halloween!


 

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